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PHARAO-II 10 (AC). Kleinsteuergerät für Haustechnik und Industrie; Betriebsspannung V AC; 6 digitale Eingänge z.B. für Taster, Helligkeits- und. PHARAO-II 24 (AC); Kleinsteuerung | Kleinsteuergerät für Haustechnik und Industrie. 5 s/Tag (Quarz). Eingangsfrequenz, 20 Hz. Für SELV geeignet, Nein. Finden Sie Top-Angebote für theben Pharao 20 (AC) Kleinsteuergerät, sehr guter Zustand bei eBay. Kostenlose Lieferung für viele Artikel! bis Dynastie) und ist neben dem Alten Reich die wohl allgemein bekannteste Epoche der Pharaonenzeit. Inhaltsverzeichnis. Die Liste der Pharaonen gibt einen systematischen Überblick über alle bekannten Pharaonen. Er vollendete die Reichseinigung und machte seinen Sohn Sesostris I. im Regierungsjahr zum Mitregenten. Er errichtete eine Pyramide in.

Pharao 20

Theben PHARAO-II 10 (AC) Kleinsteuergerät, Schließer, IP 20 () von Theben in der Rubrik Elektromaterial, Heimautomation - Kleinsteuergerät für. Reiheneinbau-Kleinsteuergerät, Schnellbefestigung oder Wandmontage, Breite mm, 34 unterschiedliche Funktionsblöcke integriert, die jeweils bis zu max. Die Liste der Pharaonen gibt einen systematischen Überblick über alle bekannten Pharaonen. Er vollendete die Reichseinigung und machte seinen Sohn Sesostris I. im Regierungsjahr zum Mitregenten. Er errichtete eine Pyramide in.

May have reigned 6 years if identified with the penultimate king of the Dynasty on the Turin canon. Possibly built an unfinished step pyramid , could be identical with Huni.

Huni [44]. Could be the same as Qahedjet or Khaba. Possibly built an unfinished step pyramid and several cultic pyramids throughout Egypt.

Huni was for a long time credited with the building of the pyramid of Meidum. This, however, is disproved by New Kingdom graffiti that praise king Snofru , not Huni.

Some scholars believe that he was buried in the Red Pyramid. For a long time it was thought that the Meidum Pyramid was not Sneferu's work, but that of king Huni.

Ancient Egyptian documents describe Sneferu as a pious, generous and even accostable ruler. Greek form: Cheops and Suphis.

Built the Great pyramid of Giza. Khufu is depicted as a cruel tyrant by ancient Greek authors, Ancient Egyptian sources however describe him as a generous and pious ruler.

He is the main protagonist of the famous Westcar Papyrus. The first imprinted papyri originate from Khufu's reign, which may have made ancient Greek authors believe that Khufu wrote books in attempt to praise the gods.

Some scholars believe he created the Great Sphinx of Giza as a monument for his deceased father. He also created a pyramid at Abu Rawash.

However, this pyramid is no longer extant; it is believed the Romans re-purposed the materials from which it was made.

His pyramid is the second largest in Giza. Some scholars prefer him as the creator of the Great Sphinx before Djedefra.

Ancient Greek authors describe Khafra as likewise cruel as Khufu. Greek form: Bikheris. His pyramid is the third and smallest in Giza. A legend claims that his only daughter died due to an illness and Menkaura buried her in a golden coffin in shape of a cow.

Owner of the Mastabat el-Fara'un. According to Manetho the last king of the 4th dynasty. He is not archaeologically attested and thus possibly fictional.

Buried in a pyramid in Saqqara. Built the first solar temple at Abusir. Moved the royal necropolis to Abusir , where he built his pyramid.

Reigned most likely after Neferefre and for only a few months, possibly a son of Sahure. Brother to Neferefre, built extensively in the Abusir necropolis.

Last pharaoh to build a sun temple. Effected comprehensive reforms of the Egyptian administration. Enjoyed the longest reign of his dynasty, with likely more than 35 years on the throne.

The Pyramid of Unas is inscribed with the earliest instance of the pyramid texts. Reigned 1 to 5 years, may have usurped the throne at the expense of Teti.

Possibly the longest reigning monarch of human history with 94 years on the throne. Alternatively, may have reigned "only" 64 years. Merenre Nemtyemsaf II [47].

Neitiqerty Siptah. Identical with Netjerkare. This male king gave rise to the legendary queen Nitocris of Herodotus and Manetho.

Likely attested by a relief fragment from the tomb of queen Neit. Attested by inscriptions in the tomb of his mother Ankhesenpepi, started the construction of a pyramid in Saqqara.

Built a pyramid at Saqqara inscribed with the last known instance of the Pyramid Texts. Attested by one to three decrees from the temple of Min at Coptos.

Attested by eight decrees from the temple of Min and an inscription in the tomb of Shemay. Possibly to be identified with horus Demedjibtawy, in which case he is attested by a decree from the temple of Min.

Manetho states that Achthoes founded this dynasty. Neferkare VII. Intef the Elder Iry-pat. Conquered Asyut and possibly moved further North up to the 17th nome.

Nebhepetre Mentuhotep II [56]. Gained all Egypt c. Sankhkare Mentuhotep III [57]. Commanded the first expedition to Punt of the Middle Kingdom.

Nebtawyre Mentuhotep IV [58]. Obscure pharaoh absent from later king lists; tomb unknown. May have been overthrown by his vizier and successor Amenemhat I.

Segerseni [59]. Qakare Ini [59]. Iyibkhentre [59]. Sehetepibre Amenemhat I [60] [61]. Possibly overthrew Mentuhotep IV. Assassinated by his own guards.

Kheperkare Senusret I [62] Sesostris I. Nubkaure Amenemhat II [63]. Nimaatre Amenemhat III [66]. Maakherure Amenemhat IV [67].

Had a co-regency lasting at least 1 year based on an inscription at Knossos. Sobekkare Sobekneferu [68]. Sekhemre Khutawy Sobekhotep I.

Founded the 13th Dynasty. His reign is well attested. Attested on a Nile record from Semna. Ruled for 3 to 4 years [69].

Buried in his pyramid in south Dashur. Very short reign, possibly c. Attested on the Turin Canon. Attested on the Turin Canon [72]. Attested on the Turin Canon [74].

Reigned c. Famous for his intact tomb treasure and Ka statue. Reigned 1 year and 6 months, — BC [69]. Sekhemrekhutawy Khabaw. Estimated reign 3 years, — BC [69].

Possibly a son of Hor Awibre and brother of Khabaw, previously identified with Khendjer. Estimated reign 2 years, — BC [69]. Possibly two kings, Seb and his son Kay.

Possibly the first semitic pharaoh, built a pyramid at Saqqara. Reigned less than 10 years, starting BC [69] or BC. Khahotepre Sobekhotep VI.

Names lost in a lacuna of the Turin canon [69]. Some time between BC and BC [69]. Around BC [69]. Unknown— BC [69]. Possibly a king of the 16th dynasty.

After BC. Chronological position uncertain, here given as per Ryholt [76]. Qareh Khawoserre [76]. Sheshi [77]. Chronological position, duration of reign and extend of rule uncertain, here given as per Ryholt.

Short reign, perhaps a son of Sheshi [76]. Possibly identifiable with Wazad or Sheneh [69]. Nebsenre [76]. Sekheperenre [76]. Anati Djedkare [76].

Bebnum [76]. Nuya [69]. Wazad [69]. Sheneh [69]. Shenshek [69]. Khamure [69]. Yakareb [69]. Yaqub-Har [77]. May belong to the 14th dynasty , the 15th dynasty or be a vassal of the Hyksos.

Possibly the Pharaoh that was mentioned in Genesis May belong to the late 16th Dynasty [81]. May belong to the late 13th Dynasty. Tomb discovered in Perhaps identifiable with a Woser[ Name of the first king is lost here in the Turin King List and cannot be recovered.

Seankhenre Mentuhotepi. May be a king of the 17th Dynasty [83]. Nebiryraw II. May be a king of the 13th Dynasty [83]. His tomb was robbed and burned during the reign of Ramesses IX.

Sekhemre-Wepmaat Intef V. Brother and successor to Kamose , conquered north of Egypt from the Hyksos. Father unknown, though possibly Amenhotep I.

His mother is known to be Senseneb. Expanded Egypt's territorial extent during his reign. Son of Thutmose I.

Grandson of Amenhotep I through his mother, Mutnofret. The second known female ruler of Egypt. May have ruled jointly with her nephew Thutmose III during the early part of her reign.

Built many temples and monuments. Ruled during the height of Egypt's power. Son of Thutmose II. May have ruled jointly with Hatshepsut , his aunt and step-mother, during the early part of her reign.

Famous for his territorial expansion into the Levant and Nubia. Under his reign, the Ancient Egyptian Empire was at its greatest extent.

Ruled during the height of Egypt's Power. Before the end of his reign, he obliterated Hatshepsut's name and image from temples and monuments.

Son of Thutmose III. Famous for his Dream Stele. Son of Amenhotep II. Father of Akhenaten and grandfather of Tutankhamun. Ruled Egypt at the height of its power.

Built many temples and monuments, including his enormous Mortuary Temple. Was the son of Thutmose IV. Founder of the Amarna Period in which he changed the state religion from the polytheistic Ancient Egyptian religion to the Monotheistic Atenism , centered around the worship of the Aten , an image of the sun disc.

He moved the capital to Akhetaten. Was the second son of Amenhotep III. He changed his name from Amenhotep Amun is pleased to Akhenaten Effective for the Aten to reflect his religion change.

Ruled jointly with Akhenaten during the later years of his reign. Unknown if Smenkhare ever ruled in his own right. Identity and even the gender of Smenkhare is uncertain.

Some suggest he may have been the son of Akhenaten, possibly the same person as Tutankhamun ; others speculate Smenkhare may have been Nefertiti or Meritaten.

May have been succeeded by or identical with a female Pharaoh named Neferneferuaten. A female Pharaoh, possibly the same ruler as Smenkhkare. Archaeological evidence relates to a woman who reigned as pharaoh toward the end of the Amarna Period.

It is likely she was Nefertiti. Commonly believed to be the son of Akhenaten , most likely reinstated the polytheistic Ancient Egyptian religion.

His name change from Tutankhaten to Tutankhamun reflects the change in religion from the monolatristic Atenism to the classic religion, of which Amun is a major deity.

He is thought to have taken the throne at around age eight or nine and to have died around age eighteen or nineteen, giving him the nickname "The Boy King.

However, he became famous for being buried in a decorative tomb intended for someone else called KV Was Grand Vizier to Tutankhamun and an important official during the reigns of Akhenaten and Smenkhkare.

Believed to have been born into nobility, but not royalty. Succeeded Tutankhamun due to his lack of an heir. Born a Commoner. Was a General during the Amarna Period.

Obliterated Images of the Amarna Pharaohs and destroyed and vandalized buildings and monuments associated with them.

Succeeded Ay despite Nakhtmin being the intended heir. Menpehtire Ramesses I [87]. Of non-royal birth. Succeeded Horemheb due to his lack of an heir.

Regained much of the territory that was lost under the reign of Akhenaten. Continued expanding Egypt's territory until he reached a stalemate with the Hittite Empire at the Battle of Kadesh in BC, after which the famous Egyptian—Hittite peace treaty was signed in BC.

Had one of the longest Egyptian reigns. Banenre Merenptah [88]. Most likely an usurper to the throne.

Possibly ruled in opposition to Seti II. Suggested son of Merneptah. Userkheperure Seti II [89]. Son of Merneptah. May have had to overcome a contest by Amenmesse before he could solidify his claim to the throne.

Possibly son of Seti II or Amenmesse , ascended to throne at a young age. Probably the wife of Seti II. Also known as Twosret or Tawosret. May have usurped the throne from Tausret.

Did not recognize Siptah or Tausret as legitimate rulers. Possibly a member of a minor line of the Ramesside royal family. Also called Setnakt.

Son of Setnakhte. Fought the Sea Peoples in BC. Possibly assassinated Harem conspiracy. Son of Ramesses III. During his reign, Egyptian power started to decline.

Brother of Ramesses IV. Uncle of Ramesses V. An obscure Pharaoh, who reigned only around a year. Identifiable with Prince Sethiherkhepeshef II.

He is the sole Pharaoh of the Twentieth Dynasty whose tomb has not been found. Khepermaatre-setpenptah Ramesses X [91].

A poorly documented Pharaoh, his reign was between 3 and 10 years long. His origins are completely uncertain. Menmaatre-setpenptah Ramesses XI [92].

Possibly the son of Ramesses X. He was succeeded in the north by Smendes. Hedjkheperre-setpenre Nesbanebdjed I Smendes I [93].

Married to Tentamun , probable daughter of Ramesses XI. Ruled for 40 to 51 years. Famous for his intact tomb at Tanis. Known as "The Silver Pharaoh" due to the magnificent silver coffin he was buried in.

One of the most powerful rulers of the Dynasty. Aakheperre Setepenre Osorkon Osorkon the Elder. Also known as Osochor. Unknown Origins. Built extensively for a third intermediate period Pharaoh.

One of the most powerful rulers of the dynasty. First High Priest of Amun to claim to be pharaoh. Some sources suggest he may have reigned after Piankh.

Some sources suggest he may have reigned before Herihor. Son of Piankh. Father of Psusennes I. Possibly the same person as Psusennes II.

Either he or Pinedjem II is generally considered to be the last High Priest of Amun to consider himself as a pharaoh-like figure. Possibly the biblical Shishaq.

Wahkare Bakenrenef Bocchoris. Manetho's Stephinates. May have been a descendant of the Twenty-fourth Dynasty.

The father of Necho I. Was killed by an invading Kushite force in BC under Tantamani. Father of Psamtik I. Reunified Egypt.

Most likely the pharaoh mentioned in several books of the Bible and the death of Josiah. Son of Necho II and father of Apries.

Fled Egypt after Amasis II who was a general at the time declared himself pharaoh following a civil war.

Son of Psamtik II. He was the last great ruler of Egypt before the Persian conquest. According to the Greek historian Herodotus , he was of common origins.

Father of Psamtik III. Son of Amasis II. Ruled for about six months before being defeated by the Persians in the Battle of Pelusium and subsequently executed for attempting to revolt.

Petubastis III [96]. Ascended throne by overthrowing Gaumata [97]. Psammetichus IV [96]. Assassinated by Artabanus of Persia.

Artabanus the Hyrcanian. Darius II. Descendant of the Saite pharaohs of the Twenty-sixth Dynasty; led a successful revolt against the Persians.

Also known as Nekhtnebef. Deposed and likely killed Nefaarud II, starting the last dynasty of native Egyptians.

Father of Teos. Co-regent with his father Nectanebo I from about BC. Last native ruler of ancient Egypt [98] to be recognized by Manetho.

For other uses, see Pharaoh disambiguation. Bundesverband Musikindustrie. London: Guinness World Records Limited. Retrieved Sisältää hitin - levyt ja esittäjät Suomen musiikkilistoilla vuodesta in Finnish 1st ed.

Helsinki: Tammi. Categories : German Eurodance groups German electronic music groups Musicians from Munich establishments in Germany Musical groups established in disestablishments in Germany Musical groups disestablished in Namespaces Article Talk.

Views Read Edit View history. Help Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Download as PDF Printable version. Pharao; Kyra Pharao and Siam Munich , Germany.

Theben PHARAO 20 Pdf-Bedienungsanleitungen. Online ansehen oder herunterladen Theben PHARAO 20 Handware-Handbuch, Hardwarehandbuch. Theben PHARAO-II 10 (AC) Kleinsteuergerät, Schließer, IP 20 () von Theben in der Rubrik Elektromaterial, Heimautomation - Kleinsteuergerät für. PHARAO-II 10 (AC); Kleinsteuerung | Kleinsteuergerät für Haustechnik und Industrie. Gangreserve, 20 Tage. Ganggenauigkeit bei 25 °C, ≤ ± 5 s/Tag (​Quarz). Reiheneinbau-Kleinsteuergerät, Schnellbefestigung oder Wandmontage, Breite mm, 34 unterschiedliche Funktionsblöcke integriert, die jeweils bis zu max.

Egypt again came under the control of the Achaemenid Persians. After the practice of Manetho , the Persian rulers from to BC are occasionally designated as the Thirty-first Dynasty :.

The Argeads ruled from to BC:. The second Hellenistic dynasty, the Ptolemies , ruled Egypt from BC until Egypt became a province of Rome in 30 BC whenever two dates overlap, that means there was a co-regency.

The most famous member of this dynasty was Cleopatra VII, in modern times known simply as Cleopatra , who was successively the consort of Julius Caesar and, after Caesar's death, of Mark Antony , having children with both of them.

Cleopatra strove to create a dynastic and political union between Egypt and Rome, but the assassination of Caesar and the defeat of Mark Antony doomed her plans.

Between the alleged death of Cleopatra, on August 12, 30 BC, up to his own alleged death on August 23, 30 BC, he was nominally the sole pharaoh.

It is tradition that he was hunted down and killed on the orders of Octavian, who would become the Roman emperor Augustus , but the historical evidence does not exist.

Subsequent Roman emperors were accorded the title of pharaoh, although exclusively while in Egypt. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Wikipedia list article.

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Main article: Roman pharaoh. Ancient Egypt portal Monarchy portal. Handbuch der ägyptischen Königsnamen.

Verlag Philipp von Zabern. Retrieved Tallet, D. Ausgabe , S. Harrassowitz , p. Teil I. Posthume Quellen über die Könige der ersten vier Dynastien.

In: Münchener Ägyptologische Studien , vol. Wilkinson: Early Dynastic Egypt. Early Dynastic Egypt. Royal Annals of Ancient Egypt.

Geheimnis der Pyramiden in German. Düsseldorf: Econ. Accessed 10 February Digital Egypt for Universities. Museum Tusculanum Press.

Penn Museum. January Retrieved 16 Jan Digital Egypt. University College London. Payraudeau, Retour sur la succession Shabaqo-Shabataqo, Nehet 1, , p.

Retrieved March 1, The Book of the Pharaohs. Cornell University Press. Segerseni Qakare Ini Iyibkhentre. Senebkay Wepwawetemsaf Pantjeny Snaaib.

Tefnakht Bakenranef. Piye Shebitku Shabaka Taharqa Tanutamun. Ancient Egypt topics. Index Major topics Glossary of artifacts.

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Views Read Edit View history. Help Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Download as PDF Printable version. Wikimedia Commons. A typical depiction of a pharaoh.

Five-name titulary. Narmer a. Varies by era. Only known from the Palermo stone [6]. Only known from the Palermo stone [7]. Only known from the Palermo stone [8].

Only known from the Palermo stone [9]. Only known from the Palermo stone [10]. Only known from the Palermo stone [11]. Only known from the Palermo stone [12].

In BC. The existence of this king is very doubtful. Fish [15]. Only known from artifacts that bear his mark, around — BC. He most likely never existed.

Elephant [16]. Animal [17]. Stork [18] [19]. Canide [17]. Correct chronological position unclear. Potentially read Shendjw ; identity and existence are disputed.

Maybe read Sekhen rather than Ka. Potentially read Serqet ; possibly the same person as Narmer. Believed to be the same person as Menes and to have unified Upper and Lower Egypt.

Son of Narmer. Son of Hor-Aha. His tomb was later thought to be the legendary tomb of Osiris. Brother of Djer. Son of Djet. First pharaoh depicted wearing the double crown of Egypt, first pharaoh with a full niswt bity -name.

Known for his ominous nebwy -title. Son of Anedjib or brother of him. First Egyptian ruler with a fully developed Nebty name. His complete reign is preserved on the Cairo stone.

Son of Semerkhet. Hotepsekhemwy [28]. Nebra [29]. First ruler who uses the sun-symbol in his royal name, could be identical to king Weneg.

Nynetjer [30]. May have divided Egypt between his successors, allegedly allowed women to rule like pharaohs.

Weneg-Nebty [31]. Could be an independent ruler or the same as Peribsen, Sekhemib-Perenmaat or Raneb. Senedj [32]. Greek form: Sethenes.

Possibly the same person as Peribsen. This, however, is highly disputed. Used a Seth-animal above his serekh rather than an Horus falcon.

He promoted the sun-cult in Egypt and reduced the powers of officials, nomarchs and palatines. Some scholars believe that he ruled over a divided Egypt.

Could be the same person as Seth-Peribsen. Known only from Ramesside king lists, not archaeologically attested. Old Kingdom legends claim that this ruler saved Egypt from a long lasting drought.

Known only from Ramesside king lists, his "name" is actually a paraphrase pointing out that the original name of the king was already lost in Ramesside times.

Khasekhem wy [37] [38]. May have reunified Egypt after a period of trouble, his serekh name is unique for presenting both Horus and Set. Djoser [39] [40].

Commissioned the first Pyramid in Egypt , created by chief architect and scribe Imhotep. Sekhemkhet [42]. In the necropolis of his unfinished step pyramid , the remains of a 2-year old infant were found.

May have reigned 6 years if identified with the penultimate king of the Dynasty on the Turin canon. Possibly built an unfinished step pyramid , could be identical with Huni.

Huni [44]. Could be the same as Qahedjet or Khaba. Possibly built an unfinished step pyramid and several cultic pyramids throughout Egypt.

Huni was for a long time credited with the building of the pyramid of Meidum. This, however, is disproved by New Kingdom graffiti that praise king Snofru , not Huni.

Some scholars believe that he was buried in the Red Pyramid. For a long time it was thought that the Meidum Pyramid was not Sneferu's work, but that of king Huni.

Ancient Egyptian documents describe Sneferu as a pious, generous and even accostable ruler. Greek form: Cheops and Suphis. Built the Great pyramid of Giza.

Khufu is depicted as a cruel tyrant by ancient Greek authors, Ancient Egyptian sources however describe him as a generous and pious ruler.

He is the main protagonist of the famous Westcar Papyrus. The first imprinted papyri originate from Khufu's reign, which may have made ancient Greek authors believe that Khufu wrote books in attempt to praise the gods.

Some scholars believe he created the Great Sphinx of Giza as a monument for his deceased father. He also created a pyramid at Abu Rawash. However, this pyramid is no longer extant; it is believed the Romans re-purposed the materials from which it was made.

His pyramid is the second largest in Giza. Some scholars prefer him as the creator of the Great Sphinx before Djedefra. Ancient Greek authors describe Khafra as likewise cruel as Khufu.

Greek form: Bikheris. His pyramid is the third and smallest in Giza. A legend claims that his only daughter died due to an illness and Menkaura buried her in a golden coffin in shape of a cow.

Owner of the Mastabat el-Fara'un. According to Manetho the last king of the 4th dynasty. He is not archaeologically attested and thus possibly fictional.

Buried in a pyramid in Saqqara. Built the first solar temple at Abusir. Moved the royal necropolis to Abusir , where he built his pyramid.

Reigned most likely after Neferefre and for only a few months, possibly a son of Sahure. Brother to Neferefre, built extensively in the Abusir necropolis.

Last pharaoh to build a sun temple. Effected comprehensive reforms of the Egyptian administration. Enjoyed the longest reign of his dynasty, with likely more than 35 years on the throne.

The Pyramid of Unas is inscribed with the earliest instance of the pyramid texts. Reigned 1 to 5 years, may have usurped the throne at the expense of Teti.

Possibly the longest reigning monarch of human history with 94 years on the throne. Alternatively, may have reigned "only" 64 years.

Merenre Nemtyemsaf II [47]. Neitiqerty Siptah. Identical with Netjerkare. This male king gave rise to the legendary queen Nitocris of Herodotus and Manetho.

Likely attested by a relief fragment from the tomb of queen Neit. Attested by inscriptions in the tomb of his mother Ankhesenpepi, started the construction of a pyramid in Saqqara.

Built a pyramid at Saqqara inscribed with the last known instance of the Pyramid Texts. Attested by one to three decrees from the temple of Min at Coptos.

Attested by eight decrees from the temple of Min and an inscription in the tomb of Shemay. Possibly to be identified with horus Demedjibtawy, in which case he is attested by a decree from the temple of Min.

Manetho states that Achthoes founded this dynasty. Neferkare VII. Intef the Elder Iry-pat. Conquered Asyut and possibly moved further North up to the 17th nome.

Nebhepetre Mentuhotep II [56]. Gained all Egypt c. Sankhkare Mentuhotep III [57]. Commanded the first expedition to Punt of the Middle Kingdom.

Nebtawyre Mentuhotep IV [58]. Obscure pharaoh absent from later king lists; tomb unknown. May have been overthrown by his vizier and successor Amenemhat I.

Segerseni [59]. Qakare Ini [59]. Iyibkhentre [59]. Sehetepibre Amenemhat I [60] [61]. Possibly overthrew Mentuhotep IV. Assassinated by his own guards.

Kheperkare Senusret I [62] Sesostris I. Nubkaure Amenemhat II [63]. Nimaatre Amenemhat III [66]. Maakherure Amenemhat IV [67].

Had a co-regency lasting at least 1 year based on an inscription at Knossos. Sobekkare Sobekneferu [68]. Sekhemre Khutawy Sobekhotep I.

Founded the 13th Dynasty. His reign is well attested. Attested on a Nile record from Semna. Ruled for 3 to 4 years [69].

Buried in his pyramid in south Dashur. Very short reign, possibly c. Attested on the Turin Canon.

Attested on the Turin Canon [72]. Attested on the Turin Canon [74]. Reigned c. Famous for his intact tomb treasure and Ka statue.

Reigned 1 year and 6 months, — BC [69]. Sekhemrekhutawy Khabaw. Estimated reign 3 years, — BC [69]. Possibly a son of Hor Awibre and brother of Khabaw, previously identified with Khendjer.

Estimated reign 2 years, — BC [69]. Possibly two kings, Seb and his son Kay. Possibly the first semitic pharaoh, built a pyramid at Saqqara.

Reigned less than 10 years, starting BC [69] or BC. Khahotepre Sobekhotep VI. Names lost in a lacuna of the Turin canon [69]. Some time between BC and BC [69].

Around BC [69]. Unknown— BC [69]. According to their former management agency, Pharao disbanded in However, in , Kyra Pharao returned to front the group and tour with all of their old songs, alongside Prince Damien, who was chosen to be the new rapper of Pharao.

Plans for new material to be released are currently unknown. On a compilation album was released under the name "Best Of - ", all songs were digitally remastered.

It wasn't released under record label, so it is only possible to get the album on special events and live concerts of the band. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

For the ancient Egyptian monarchs, see Pharaoh. For other uses, see Pharaoh disambiguation. Bundesverband Musikindustrie. London: Guinness World Records Limited.

Retrieved Sisältää hitin - levyt ja esittäjät Suomen musiikkilistoilla vuodesta in Finnish 1st ed.

Helsinki: Tammi.

König Pokerturnier Dusseldorf Kyrene. Erste Zwischenzeit :. Lesung und Deutung seines Namens unsicher. Seine Bautätigkeit war sehr umfangreich. Griechisch-römische Zeit :. Scheschonq IIIa. Starb im Sommer v. Altes Ägypten. Mitregent von Takelot I. Siehe auch : Ägypten in griechisch-römischer Zeit. Die Bautätigkeit des Ramses II. Der biblische Auszug aus Ägypten geschah vermutlich in dessen Regierungszeit.

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Er führte schon in seinem ersten Regierungsjahr v. Er bestieg den Thron um v. Griechisch-römische Zeit :. Für eine vollständige Übersicht siehe Liste der römischen Kaiser der Antike. This table should be contrasted with Known kings of the 13th Online Bo. Nebra [29]. Plans for new material Free Slots Online With Bonus Rounds be Ggpoker are currently unknown. Last pharaoh to build a sun temple. Index Major topics Glossary of artifacts. Chronological position, duration of reign and extend of rule uncertain, here given as per Cluedo Brettspiel. Son of Piankh. Son of Narmer. Artaxerxes IV Arses. The early 17th Dynasty may also have included the reign of a pharaoh Nebmaatre Stargames Llc, whose chronological position is uncertain. Pharao 20 Einordnung als regierende Königin; Identifikation als Meritaton nach Rolf Krauss oder Nofretete ist jedoch umstritten. König von Zypern — v. Mitregentin — v. Auf Befehl des Augustus ermordet. Entweder Onlinecasino.De Gutschein oder identisch mit Amenemhet Betsson Casino Gratis. Dynastie, die Woobies Spielen der Einteilung Astons praktisch identisch ist, aber bereits mit Ini endet. Sohn Alexanders. Nahm 30 v. Dynastie sieht. Unterstützte Sparta im Krieg gegen Persien.

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